The Zero Waste Period

I came across and article recently about the zero waste period. I had previously heard of the menstrual cup, but it turns out there are far more options (which is a good thing really).

There were three things that I found really interesting to consider with these alternatives. The first of course being their positive environmental impact, the second being people’s statements around how not using synthetic disposable materials has made their monthly cycle more comfortable and the last being around the coast saving. Apparently, women can spend $5000-10,000 on sanitary products in their lifetime. Whereas with the zero waste alternatives, you’re looking more around $1000-$2000 in your lifetime. Or less if your products last well. So, what are these alternative options?

First off, of course there is the option of using a menstrual cup instead of tampons. A cup can last you up to 10 years as oppose to a box every period or so. But it is a rather liberal option being a cup inside your you-know-where.

Secondly, there is the reusable pad option instead of the synthetic disposable pad option. This kind of reminds me of cloth nappies in terms of its philosophy. But I’m willing to consider it as an option.

Thirdly, there is period underwear. This one reminds me of incontinence underwear. But at the same time, I’m thinking that perhaps period-proof underwear is the secret to no leakage.

And lastly, there is the sea sponge. This is the option I am least sure about, because a bit like the beauty blender, how much bacteria is getting in there in the 6 months it is supposed to last?

So, if you want to get on the zero waste bandwagon ladies, here is some alternatives that could long-term be great for the environment, your body and your wallet.

Krystal xx

 

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Beauty Test: Cocoa Powder

Natural Beauty is a big thing and something I’m keen to embrace. But do some of these DIY ingredients from your cupboard natural beauty tricks work? This week I tested adding cocoa powder to your shampoo as a way to darken brunette hair.

The biggest challange I found was finding the right container to mix your shampoo and cocoa powder in. Other than that it was business as usual. I put the cocoa powder shampoo in my hair and washed it out just like normal shampoo. Although I did leave it in for 5 minutes whereas normal shampoo I would have washed out sooner. Then I conditioned and dried my hair as usual.

I didn’t find the cocoa powder shampoo made much difference and the slight tint only lasted a couple of days. But for a very natural looking alternative, this one is subtle, doesn’t leave the hair dry or feeling clogged up and it smells great.

Krystal xx

Are You SAD This Winter?

Season Affect Disorder (SAD) is a sub-disorder under depressive disorder in the DSM-V as depressive episodes occur with season changes. Winter in particular seems to bring on depressive episodes. This disorder used to be its own separate disorder in the previous DSM, the DSM-IV, but has since been changed to a sub-disorder of depression.

To be diagnosed as having SAD, onset and remission of episodes must occur with only seasonal changes over a 2 year period. Over the individual’s lifetime seasonal depressive episodes must be significantly outnumber non-seasonal depressive episodes. The seasonal depressive episodes must also not be able to be explained by other psychological stressors such as seasonal unemployment or work schedule.

Other symptoms of SAD include:

  • Prominent energy
  • Hypersomnia
  • Overeating
  • Weight gain
  • Craving carbohydrates

Another potentially related disorder is bi-polar disorder where there is also a possible pattern to depressive episodes (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

Krystal xx

 

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5®). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Publishing.